New portrait painting of Prince Philip highlights links with Denmark

Wearing a menacingly friendly smile and the blue sash of the order of the elephant, Denmark’s highest-ranking honour, the Duke of Edinburgh stands in the grand corridor of Windsor Castle in a new portrait unveiled on Monday.

It was painted in the year Prince Philip announced his retirement from formal public engagements at the age of 96, and will be on display in a museum exhibition in Denmark before moving to London in 2018. The artist, the Australian-born Ralph Heimans, said he hoped it did justice “to his unique character”.

 

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A New Portrait of Prince Philip Looks Like It Was Pulled Straight from The Crown

Prince Philip, that debonair and complicated figure from two seasons of The Crown and 70 years of being married to Queen Elizabeth II, has a new portrait to share with the world. Artist Ralph Heimans has rendered a lifelike Duke of Edinburgh in Grand Corridor at Windsor Castle, where the monarchs spend their weekends. It may look like a luscious still from the The Crown—all moodily lit and drenched in color—but that’s just Heimans’s style, and he got there first. See the Australian artist’s portrait of the Queen for her Diamond Jubilee in 2012.

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New portrait of Prince Philip highlights his Danish heritage

Prince Phillip's ancestry is being honoured in a new portrait released by Buckingham Palace on Monday.

Painted by Australian artist Ralph Heimans, the Duke of Edinburgh is shown in the Grand Corridor at Windsor Castle wearing the sash of the Order of the Elephant - Denmark's highest-ranking honour.

Heimans, who painted an official portrait of the Queen to mark her Diamond Jubilee in 2012, said of his work: "I feel very fortunate to have been given the opportunity to paint Prince Philip and hope the portrait does justice to his unique character [...] Aesthetically, the natural light and heritage backdrop of the Grand Corridor at Windsor Castle provided a compelling mood. I hope people enjoy the work as much as I enjoyed producing it."

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Australian painter Ralph Heimans unveils portrait of Prince Philip

“Painting this work in the year of the Duke of Edinburgh’s retirement from public duties felt particularly poignant and informed the multi-layered narrative of the portrait,” Heimans said. “I feel very fortunate to have been given the opportunity to paint Prince Philip and hope the portrait does justice to his unique character.”

Heimans is no stranger to the royal family. He was the only artist to be granted a sitting with the Queen for her Diamond Jubilee, locating the monarch in Westminster Abbey.

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Prince Philip goes back to his Danish roots in new portrait

A new portrait of the Duke of Edinburgh is to go on display in the UK and Denmark next year.

Painted by artist Ralph Heimans, Philip is shown in the imposing setting of Windsor Castle wearing the sash of the Order of the Elephant, Denmark's highest-ranking honour.

The Duke has a close association with the Nordic country as he was born a Prince of Denmark, as well of Greece, before becoming a naturalised British subject in the 1940s.

His grandfather, George I of Greece, was a Danish prince born in Copenhagen, while his great grandfather Christian IX was king of Denmark from 1863 to 1906.

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Prince Philip Pays Homage to His Mother and His Danish Royal Ancestry in a New Portrait

At 96-years-old, Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh looks dashing in a new portrait commissioned to mark the royal's retirement from public engagements.

The painting, which will be on display at the Museum of National History at Frederiksborg Castle in Denmark in 2018, was done by Australian artist Ralph Heimans earlier this year. 

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Artnet News: Alexander James on How Water Can Be a Photographic Medium

Alexander James has one of the most complex photographic practices of any artist working today. His current exhibition All Icons are False displays still lifes of flowers and skulls bathed in an eerie light and painterly atmosphere—a sort of trompe l’oeil effect achieved by photographing all the objects completely submerged in water.

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