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EMMA HOPKINS

UK,  B. 1989

In my studio, photo taken by Robin Farquhar-Thomson (3).jpg
 
 
 

 

Born in Brighton in 1989, Emma Hopkins studied at Brighton and Hove City College from 2005 to 2007, thereafter she went on to study at the University of London from 2007 to 2010, where she was trained in the special art of prosthetics for performance. Since then, Hopkins has studied Drawing the Human Anatomy at The Royal Drawing School, London, in 2015. She now lives and works in London.

There are two very distinct driving forces behind the artist’s work: ‘One is a painfully analytical, scientific mind set that continually questions everything that you or I do’, states Hopkins, ‘this side of me wants to break us down, both physically and mentally, to analyse all the parts and to live in hope that one day it will understand us as a whole. Then there is the other, the free spirited, creative mind set that instinctively knows- there are no definitive answers. This side of me feeds on emotions, on sensations, and loves, more than anything, freedom from thought. In my current paintings I am seeking to harmonise these two forces.’

Based upon her understanding and knowledge of the human anatomy, Hopkins allows parts of her work to revel in the deep analysis of concrete substance; skin, flesh, and bones. By focusing on the parts of the body that we use most to express our thoughts and feelings - the face, hands, and eyes - she simultaneously allows her work to flow freely in between as if the blood is feeding oxygen to a preserved life force. ‘I work with subjects that have, in their own right, fascinated me’, Hopkins explains, ‘I tend to paint these subjects more than once to mirror our multifaceted nature and to allow me to explore themes that I fear the most; hidden motives, illness, and death.’ 

Hopkins paints subjects that have, in their own right, fascinated her as an artist: ‘I tend to paint these subjects more than once to mirror our multifaceted nature and to allow me to explore themes that I fear the most; hidden motives, illness and death.’