THE ART OF HANGING

Whether your collection is extensively large or still in its inception, the art of hanging is an untold that all art lovers need to adhere to if they are to do their works justice.

When done correctly, hanging a piece of art in your house may appear effortless, simple and
perfectly in sync with the composition of your house. However, as articles by Clara Arts, Christie’s and House and Garden have pointed out, there are a great many considerations to be had before one puts nails in the walls:

Source: Achica Living

Source: Achica Living

Height
For singular pieces, an idea could be to bring them quite low to the furniture they hang above. This way the artwork feels more associated with the things around them.

Correct Scaling
Choose the right picture for the right wall space. In essence, a small picture for a small place, large picture for a large place. Where would it have the greatest impact?

Use Negative Space
The negative space that surrounds your art can be just as important as the work itself, as Christie’s quoted Marc Oliver Wahler noting:

‘Negative space is, to me, one of the most unevaluated elements
when it comes to placing several artworks together’
Source: Miami Design District 

Source: Miami Design District 

Find Visual Connections
When paring or grouping your pictures together, consider the colouring, imagery and composition tocreate visual connections. However, don’t be afraid to mix pieces from different styles, periods and genres as this help your collection looking less two dimensional.

Avoid Danger Areas
Try to avoid placing artwork in places that could cause damage, for example above your bed in case of the event of it falling on you in the night. Getting to know the infrastructure of your home is advisable, this way you can avoid putting a nail into any electrical wiring or water pipes.

Be Precise
Using tape measure and spirit level is a must, as Christie’s ‘Don’t always trust your eye’.
Photographs, watercolours and other works on paper should be hung away from sunlight, as it will cause significant fading and other damage over time.

The Exhibition at Salon De Louvre in 1787, an early example of a Salon Hanging. Source: The Elisha Whittelsey Collection,The Elisha Whittelsey Fund, 1949

The Exhibition at Salon De Louvre in 1787, an early example of a Salon Hanging. Source: The Elisha Whittelsey Collection,The Elisha Whittelsey Fund, 1949

Salon Style Hang
Salon style hanging originated in 17 th century France at the Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture. During the regular exhibitions of students work space would be scarce, resulting in the works being tightly packed, hung as close to the ceiling and floor as possible.

Rita Konig writes that her approach to Salon Walls is to ‘always break a line’, by which she means rather than the collage assembled in a square shape; instead have the edges more erratic and seemingly randomly placed. This allows room for errors.

It is also important to avoid having large gaps between the pictures that run together like street avenues. It makes the assembly appear disorganized and segmented.